Saturday, 17 December 2016

Tasted #332 - 333: Highland Park 25 and Highland Park 40 Year Old

Highland Park's "Ice" may have been the focus of its recent launch in Hong Kong, but there were a few other drams fighting for the limelight that week too - namely the Highland Park 25 year old, and Highland Park 40 year old. Having tried the 30 year old a few years ago, I was happy to be able to finally sample its older and younger siblings (and not spend over £200 for the privilege!)




Highland Park 40 Year Old (48.3% ABV, 40yo, Orkney, Scotland, $21,800HKD / Not currently available in Australia / £1,996 ex-VAT)
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Colour: Dark orange copper.

Nose: Honey-drizzled orange slices. Papaya. Perfumed oak. Marmalade on toast.

Palate: More citrus - whole oranges dipped in Dark Chocolate. Hugely perfumed. Floral spice, leather, oak - lots going on here. Honey and the slightest hint of earthy peat.

Finish: Soft honey smoke that lingers, and lingers, and lingers (and you're very glad it does).

Rating (on my very non-scientific scale): 94/100. Just beautiful. 



Highland Park 25 Year Old (45.7% ABV, 25yo, Orkney, Scotland, $4,200HKD / Not currently available in Australia£280.42 ex-VAT)
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Colour: Golden toffee.

Nose: Honey, toffee, roasted chestnuts. Nutty pie with a sugary centre. 

Palate: Rich, warming honey drizzled over waffles. Chewy toffee. Slightly leather / furniture polish notes. There's a slightly smokey earthiness - a hint of earthy peat. It's one of those drams that has a lot of characteristics of an old, well-matured whisky - the sort of notes you never, ever see on younger whiskies.

Finish: Long and earthy. Oak and leather. Beautiful.

Rating (on my very non-scientific scale): 94/100. The 30yo is a lovely dram, I prefer the 25, which I'd put on equal footing with the 40.


Cheers,
Martin.

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